Eucharistic Procession

It was a perfect day dedicated to the Eucharistic Jesus.  The floral carpets which were lovingly hand-made by parents, teachers, students, staff and alumanae were ready.  All of us waited in anticipation for that moment when He will pass by to bless us and to gently lift our hearts and spirits up with His presence. Each petal, each bud, each bit of sawdust that made up these beautiful floral carpets carried with them our overflowing gratitude and our hearts’ greatests desires and deepest sorrows.  When He passed by there was nothing but great adoration for the One who has made everything that is, that was and that will ever be…

 

4 Comments on Eucharistic Procession

  1. Persian rugs
    April 9, 2016 at 9:41 pm (2 years ago)

    Great post very knowledgeable and Your pictures of the carpets fashioned from colored sawdust and flowers remind me of my recent trip to Guatemala. I visited the colonial town of Antigua expressly to witness their Holy Week festivities.

    Reply
  2. JODYxBUFFY
    April 17, 2010 at 6:10 pm (8 years ago)

    Your pictures of the carpets fashioned from colored sawdust and flowers remind me of my recent trip to Guatemala. I visited the colonial town of Antigua expressly to witness their Holy Week festivities. Some guidebooks consider them among the Top 10 religious festivities in the world. In Antigua, many residents construct long and intiricate alfombras in the streets fronting their homes or businesses. The alfombras serve as “red carpets” for processions. Some residents initiate construction at mdnight in order for the alfombra to be completed by the time a procession arrives. The processions themselves are amazing, consisting of over 60 people carrying large floats of Our Lord or the Sorrowful Mother that weigh as much as 6 tons! These are accompanied by bands playing dirges and the like. The alfombras can be extremely elaborate, with some sporting Persian carpet motifs and decorations. Do a Google image search for Semana Santa Antigua Alfombras to get an idea of their appearance and quality.

    Are sawdust and floral carpets also a tradition in the Philippines? Supposedly, the Spaniards from Andalucia introduced the tradition in many of ther colonies.

    Reply
    • Blanca
      April 21, 2010 at 5:21 am (8 years ago)

      Hi Jody,

      Thank you for leaving a comment here. This is a tradition started by the school where I am working five years ago. Although holy procession are part of our religious activities here in the Philippines, we were the first to do this kind of floral carpets here in the Philippines. It is through the initiative of parents, students, teachers and staff. Something that we look forward to every year.=)

      Reply
  3. Magda
    December 3, 2008 at 5:20 am (9 years ago)

    This is beautiful

    Reply

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