Teaching Nine-year-olds

I’m gonna miss teaching for a while…not because I am taking a leave off from work but because it’s also vacation time for us teachers…this year I can say that I’ve never enjoyed teaching this much..I taught in pre-school before to four year olds and five years old, they are cute, cuddly and nice. They will adore you, you are the world to them and your word is the law. The parents will just say your name and ding! Their children will automatically follow… But nothing I can say beats teaching 9 year olds. I handled three sections of grade three this year, I absolutely had a grand time! Each section is unique, I had the brainy-section, the nothing-can-shake-us-not-even-an-earthquake section (which unfortunately is my class advisory) and the everything-goes section. I called the first section the brainy section because great ideas, opinions and point of views flow everytime I teach in this section. The discussion goes so smoothly that the three day lesson plan that I prepare gets cut down to just one day. In this section, you can find the girl with the wide-rimmed glasses often reciting facts straight out of the handout, the girl who is often not just there but when you check her test papers you will be surprised that she gets everything perfect, the girl who hates the world and so she creates her own world in her drawing pad and with her books, and the girl who in whatever she does she excels, and so her classmates absolutely hate and love her for it at the same time…For the nothing-can-shake-us section, I must admit I have to thank them for wringing out in me all the creative juices that I have to make my class an absolutely not! boring class, for they are hard to please. The great and exciting activities just fall flat with them. Not so much because they want to make it hard for you and they are just not interested but simply because they are looking out for more than what you can give sometimes, and so you exert an extra effort here and there until they warmed up to your ideas and join in. You will find here the girl who is too shy to recite but when she recites she has the brightest ideas, the girl who is simply intelligent with no effort at all, and the girl who needs your special attention because she just can’t understand everything on her own…you will realize for yourself when you’re with them that teaching is not simply enumerating facts but also bringing it to the level where they can relate and understand it better…Now, for the everything goes section, no teaching days are ever same with them. They are spontaneous, carefree and smart. A simple discussion can turn into a heated debate to them, a motivational game can turn out to be the best game of their life that they had to win and a simple “settle down girls” won’t do, you have to holler and scream to get their attention, and when you do that, they will holler and scream at each other to remind each other to settle down and so chaos begins. And when you step out of their classroom at the end of the period, you will feel like you’ve been teaching the whole day but even so you will suddenly realize that they made your day….here you can find the girl who is so emotional that happy or sad she will burst into tears, the girl who can’t seem to keep herself from blurting out the answers therefore making her classmates want to kill her for spoiling it for them, and the girl who is often taking her own sweet time in everything that she does making you so frustrated but because of her sweetness you forgive her for it…Teaching is not an effort when you do it for them, it is simply a breeze…I remember when I asked the girls to write a letter to the mayor , I can’t help but laugh at some of their works… one of my students after praising the mayor for a job well done wrote as a closing “..and I hope you die happy and holy..” and another one after criticizing the mayor for the projects in their community that didn’t work out, in her postscript wrote “..by the way, nice shot there in the billboard where did you have it taken?” and the most hilarious of all, my Korean student wrote “…Dear Mr. Aldrin San Pedro, good morning dear…”…Aaawww, I would simply miss the girls…I will miss their intelligence, spontaneity, spark and spunk… I will miss their drawings and little notes that say, “You’re the best teacher “, “Your so cool” or “follow us in intermediate miss, please”..I’m just so thankful and glad that for a year at least, I was able to make a mark and difference in their lives…

5 Comments on Teaching Nine-year-olds

  1. Samy
    February 18, 2012 at 10:52 am (5 years ago)

    Greetings Blanca I enjoyed your informative article on Teaching Nine. I love this article very much. I’ll definitely be back again. Hope that I can read far more helpful posts then.
    Samy invites you to read: Laundry Detergent CouponsMy Profile

    Reply
    • Blanca
      February 18, 2012 at 12:01 pm (5 years ago)

      Thanks Samy.;)

      Reply
  2. Cuppy Puppy Cupcakes
    March 19, 2008 at 12:15 pm (9 years ago)

    i love how passionate you are about your students. making sure that you are the appropriate teacher for each class. No wonder your kids want to take you with them in intermediate!

    Reply
  3. nanblancs
    March 19, 2008 at 3:23 am (9 years ago)

    Hi, thanks!:) heard about your mom.:( dn’t worry cat everything will be okay. Be assured with the thought that she is in a much better place right now…you take care and just release everything in writing…looking forward to your blogs also..

    Reply
  4. cathy
    Twitter:
    March 18, 2008 at 11:24 am (9 years ago)

    haha! kahit anong age pa, auko na magturo! haha:) i don’t know why…maybe because i stopped na for quite sometime. anyway, nice blog blanky. hope to read more from u soon:)
    PS – di me mka-blog ngayon. so busy, my mom is in the hspital eh. toxic. but i’ll write again as soon as everything is well again. tc!

    Reply

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